03.25.2015

What has happened since the first Comparative Literature hires were made in Arabic over the last few decades?

11.04.2013

Arash Beidollahkhani, a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at the University of Tehran, connects the Arab Spring to Occupy and other protests globally. See Part I for the first installment of his article.

10.11.2013

Arash Beidollahkhani, a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at the University of Tehran, connects the Arab Spring to Occupy and other protests globally.

06.23.2013

The #Taksim protests in #Turkey should IMHO be read as part of #Occupy, not as analogous to the #Arab_Spring. The same is true of the protests in Brazil: Occupy not Spring.

03.30.2013

Arabic poetics—the theories of criticism of poetry and eloquence in classical (mediaeval) Arabic scholarship—has a great deal to offer the contemporary reader and critic.

12.19.2012

I've just finished a review of a recent monograph on a mediaeval Arabic scholar in which I noted a few translation and typographical errors, commended the philology involved, and gave a synopsis of the contents. So much, so unsurprising; this is the way my field works.

12.06.2012

The Leveson Inquiry into the culture, practice, and ethics of the press in the United Kingdom has just issued its report. The inquiry was occasioned by the phone-hacking scandal that engulfed the UK tabloid press (especially Rupert Murdoch's titles) in 2011.

Alexander Key

Alexander Key's interests range across the literary and intellectual history of the Arabic and Persian-speaking worlds from the seventh century, together with Western political thought and philosophy. He received his Ph.D. in Arabic and Islamic Studies from Harvard University’s Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in May 2012 and started work at Stanford that same year.

He is currently writing a book, The Arabic Obsession with Language: theory in the eleventh century. It looks at ma'na in the thought of Ibn Furak, ar-Raghib al-Isfahani, Avicenna, and Abd al-Qahir al-Jurjani, and argues that this commonplace yet under-studied Arabic word is the key to these scholars’ theology, philosophy, and poetics. Key is also preparing a second book for publication, an intellectual biography of ar-Raghib that includes an edition of Landberg 175, the unicum manuscript of ar-Raghib’s poetics. 

debate between grammar and logic, a study of Quranic inimitability in ar-Raghib, and an argument against calling Classical Arabic civilization “humanist.” Beyond his research, Key teaches an undergraduate course on the “Ethics of Jihad,” and is a founding editor of the double-blind peer-reviewed journal for early career scholars: New Middle Eastern Studies.

For his departmental page, the Stanford DLCL. For copies of some publications, academia.edu. And for tweets, @AlexanderMKey.