• Blog Post

    How to Watch "Get Out" Again

    by David Shih
    When watching the film "Get Out," what if white people and non-black people of color saw their responsibility as more than nodding knowingly at microaggressions or bits of cotton stuffing? What if they realized that "Get Out" can also be about what it feels like to be themselves in America? more
  • Blog Post

    "Lady Bird," the Iraq War, and Not Quite Nostalgia

    by Lindsay Turner
    What’s unique about the film "Lady Bird" is that its nostalgia for the USA of 2002-2003 isn’t quite nostalgia. With a strange gentleness, the film builds itself around the feeling of recognizing the scary present in a past you can still manage to love. more
  • Colloquy

    Postcolonial Spatialities

    by Ato Quayson
    On one reading postcolonial studies seem to be riveted more firmly on temporal as opposed to spatial questions. This may be traced partly to the effect of the temporalizing "post-" in the term postcolonialism, which has allowed an insistence on various dates as inaugurating the epochal postcolonial relation.  more
  • Colloquy

    Imagining the Oceans

    by Margaret Cohen
    The oceans cover three-quarters of the globe. They sustain life on land and shape societies across history and culture. The ocean environment at the same time is forbidding and remote, hostile to... more
  • Colloquy

    Shakespeare and Cervantes 1616-2016

    by Roland Greene
    An early modern transatlantic world in which information moved slowly could hardly have noticed the date, but 401 years later it registers for us: on April 23, 1616 in the Julian and the Gregorian... more
  • Colloquy

    Tropicalismo Fifty Years Later

    by Christopher Dunn
    Tropicália is the name of a cultural moment in late 1960s Brazil that was manifest in nearly all realms of artistic production, especially in popular music, but also the visual arts, theater, film... more
  • Dibur Issue

    The Long Poem

    Edited by Uri S. Cohen, Michael Golston, Vered K. Shemtov
  • Dibur Article

    After the Long Poem

    by Rachel Blau DuPlessis
    Could I ever write an adequate summation of my work with the long poem? My writing of Drafts is a palimpsest of encounters and stacked timelines, necessities, drives, and stubbornness. Such an... more

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Recent Multimedia

  • no image
    video
    by Patrick Trefz
    Margaret Cohen, Anne Higonnet, and Jim Denevan discuss representations of the ocean in painting, sculpture, photography, and film.
  • no image
    video
    by Melissa Langer and Catharine Axley
    The ocean is not just one thing. How have we imagined the oceans? How have we represented them? Margaret Cohen and Anne Higonnet reflect on these questions.
  • no image
    video
    by Caetano Veloso
    The singer and songwriter is interviewed by Marjorie Perloff at the 2016 Modern Language Association Convention in Austin. He discusses his early encounters with American music, how he views his...

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When watching the film "Get Out," what if white people and non-black people of color saw their responsibility as more than nodding knowingly at microaggressions or bits of cotton stuffing? What if they realized that "Get Out" can also be about what it feels like to be themselves in America?
What’s unique about the film "Lady Bird" is that its nostalgia for the USA of 2002-2003 isn’t quite nostalgia. With a strange gentleness, the film builds itself around the feeling of recognizing the scary present in a past you can still manage to love.
Donald Trump did not invent the ungrateful black athlete stereotype, but he made it familiar. The stereotype recasts professionals at the top of their game as that black person who doesn’t know how to do their job. Maxine Waters. Frederica Wilson. La David Johnson. Barack Obama. “Ungrateful” is only the latest way to say that a black worker is unworthy because they are black.
Religious reformers like Martin Luther laid the groundwork for the later emergence of Liberal political economy by purging late-medieval conceptions of the monetary instrument as a potentially boundless public utility from the collective imagination.
Toussaint Louverture is celebrated by some as a saint worthy of his namesake. Recent work by historian Philippe Girard paints a less saintly portrait of this seminal figure of the Haitian Revolution.