Blogs

by Jonathan Mayhew | 08.11.2009
I never had a good relationship to fusion when fusion was most popular—a period that coincided with my own teenage years. Now I can appreciate certain aspects of it more because I no longer feel resentful that it watered down jazz just at the moment when I was coming of age as a jazz fan.
by Jonathan Mayhew | 08.10.2009
For my first post on Arcade I thought I would introduce myself and my recent and current projects.  I graduated with a PhD in Comparative Literature from Stanford in 1988 and am Professor of Spanish at the University of Kansas in Lawrence.  I blog at Bemsha Swing, mostly about jazz and contemporary Spanish poetry.
by Christopher Warley | 08.09.2009
With the help of Bonnie Tyler's 1983 #1 hit “Total Eclipse of the Heart,” I'm still trying to figure out what differentiates Adorno from what he calls cultural critics in "Cultural Criticism and Society."  
by Jack Chen | 08.04.2009
This piece, "The Real Reasons to Support Language Study," published July 27, 2009 in The Chronicle of Higher Education, is particularly relevant given the recent announcement by UCLA to issue lay-off letters to its state-funded, "post-six" lecturers.
by Jack Chen | 08.03.2009
Lately, I've been trying to educate myself on the way that public higher education works, particularly at the University of California where I teach.
by Brian Reed | 08.02.2009
One way to fight an addiction is to try to substitute a second, healthier activity for the baleful one.  Lately, during the evenings, to prevent myself from playing World of Warcraft, I have been translating Russian verse. 
by Christopher Warley | 08.01.2009
In Italian, when you say someone’s email address (chris dot warley at utoronto dot ca), instead of “at” you say “chiocciola,” which means snail, because @ sort of looks like a snail.
by Cecile Alduy | 07.30.2009
Pornographic literature is dismissed as an oxymoron by many scholars because we expect ‘literature’ to imply form, while the endless repetition of unproblematic sex acts denies us the comforting format of beginning, middle, and end.

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