Blogs

by Gregory Jusdanis | 06.20.2017
Nostalgia is our reaction to rapid social change. It expresses our desire to return to a time we imagine as happier and more innocent. Cavafy’s cosmopolitanism was an ideal we cannot recreate. But neither should we dismiss it, as many are want to do, because of its imperfections and injustices.
by Eleanor Courtemanche | 05.23.2017
All good things must come to an end, right? As we imagine the possible end of Trump's presidency, consider these scenarios that are about as unlikely as President Trump seemed this time last year. 
by Ali Shakir | 05.16.2017
Who—in this shamelessly visual age—would bother to read an analysis of the Muslim world’s modern history when ISIS is swamping social media with ghastly short videos whose impact on viewers is often irrevocable? What can my apologetic writings change if the Pandora’s Box of fear has been opened and is indiscriminately spreading poison?
by Ali Shakir | 05.15.2017
The next time you read an inspiring book, listen to an enchanting melody or even pass by a well-structured piece in some boutique window, do not be surprised if it turns out to be the work of another “architect on hold" struggling to reconcile theory and practice in the contemporary world. 
by Scott Ferguson | 05.09.2017
MMT and Marxism share histories and methods but diverge at the level of ontology. Critical humanists must reckon with this cleavage in order to help forge a more just and prosperous future.  
by Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra | 04.29.2017
How was Aristotelian theory (of nature, of the state, and of society) debated and implemented by the Spanish in the New World? Understanding this tradition and its impact gives a new perspective on Spanish Colonialism in the Americas.  
by Gregory Jusdanis | 04.25.2017
Friendship linked our dinner with Irakli and Anna, our drive to the Caucasus Mountains, and our final discussions in Tbilisi on conflict resolution. Friends inspire us to escape the monasticism of our thinking by asking us to embrace people who live outside our home.
by Kathryn Hume | 04.18.2017
Primitive hunter-gatherers, given the broad range of tasks they had to carry out to survive, have a skill set more immune to the “cognitive” smarts of new AI technologies than a highly educated, highly specialized service worker! This reveals something about both the nature of AI and the nature of the division of labor in contemporary capitalism. It helps us understand that AI systems are best viewed as idiot savants, not Renaissance Men.

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