Blogs

by Ali Shakir | 05.16.2017
Who—in this shamelessly visual age—would bother to read an analysis of the Muslim world’s modern history when ISIS is swamping social media with ghastly short videos whose impact on viewers is often irrevocable? What can my apologetic writings change if the Pandora’s Box of fear has been opened and is indiscriminately spreading poison?
by Ali Shakir | 05.15.2017
The next time you read an inspiring book, listen to an enchanting melody or even pass by a well-structured piece in some boutique window, do not be surprised if it turns out to be the work of another “architect on hold" struggling to reconcile theory and practice in the contemporary world. 
by Scott Ferguson | 05.09.2017
MMT and Marxism share histories and methods but diverge at the level of ontology. Critical humanists must reckon with this cleavage in order to help forge a more just and prosperous future.  
by Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra | 04.29.2017
How was Aristotelian theory (of nature, of the state, and of society) debated and implemented by the Spanish in the New World? Understanding this tradition and its impact gives a new perspective on Spanish Colonialism in the Americas.  
by Gregory Jusdanis | 04.25.2017
Friendship linked our dinner with Irakli and Anna, our drive to the Caucasus Mountains, and our final discussions in Tbilisi on conflict resolution. Friends inspire us to escape the monasticism of our thinking by asking us to embrace people who live outside our home.
by Kathryn Hume | 04.18.2017
Primitive hunter-gatherers, given the broad range of tasks they had to carry out to survive, have a skill set more immune to the “cognitive” smarts of new AI technologies than a highly educated, highly specialized service worker! This reveals something about both the nature of AI and the nature of the division of labor in contemporary capitalism. It helps us understand that AI systems are best viewed as idiot savants, not Renaissance Men.
by Steve Mentz | 04.03.2017
The Anthropocene accounts for a vast swath of human and natural history, but there are limits to its scope encouraging the proliferation of numerous other 'cenes. From the Chthulucene to the Anglocene, these terms explain our ecological present from a myriad of different perspectives. 
by William Flesch | 03.21.2017
Blanchot (commenting on Priam's supplication of Achilles) says the choice in Homer is violence or speech. In Vergil, in the modern state, our choice is only violence or the silence, whether of Dido or Ajax, imposed upon us by our isolation within the emptiness of our dreams (Milton).

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