• Colloquy

    Thing Theory in Literary Studies

    by Sarah Wasserman, Patrick Moran
    That things capture our imagination is hardly news. As Andrew Cole wrote in a 2016 issue of October, "materialism is as old as the hills." Cole claims that new approaches to studying things allow us to find similarities where we have too often found difference, and that this method dates back at least to Hegel and Marx. more
  • Blog Post

    Privileging your checks

    by William Flesch
    When playing chess, what do you mean when you say "check"? Per Wittgenstein, perhaps we communicate in ways that have surprisingly little to do with what we actually say. more
  • Blog Post

    Walking Along Newtown Creek

    by Steve Mentz
    Rather than ignoring the toxic legacies of our industrial past, what if we engaged with remnants such as Newtown Creek to imagine a more fluid and dynamic Antropocene that moves away from green fantasies towards assessing troubling but necessary realities? more
  • Blog Post

    Distant Reading After Moretti

    by Lauren Klein
    It is not a coincidence that distant reading does not deal well with gender, sexuality, or race. But if we re-commit ourselves to the project of exposing and interrogating power, we arrive potentially at a form of distant reading that is much more inclusive. more
  • Colloquy

    Postcolonial Spatialities

    by Ato Quayson
    On one reading postcolonial studies seem to be riveted more firmly on temporal as opposed to spatial questions. This may be traced partly to the effect of the temporalizing "post-" in the term postcolonialism, which has allowed an insistence on various dates as inaugurating the epochal postcolonial relation.  more
  • Colloquy

    Imagining the Oceans

    by Margaret Cohen
    The oceans cover three-quarters of the globe. They sustain life on land and shape societies across history and culture. The ocean environment at the same time is forbidding and remote, hostile to... more
  • Colloquy

    Shakespeare and Cervantes 1616-2016

    by Roland Greene
    An early modern transatlantic world in which information moved slowly could hardly have noticed the date, but 401 years later it registers for us: on April 23, 1616 in the Julian and the Gregorian... more
  • Colloquy

    Tropicalismo Fifty Years Later

    by Christopher Dunn
    Tropicália is the name of a cultural moment in late 1960s Brazil that was manifest in nearly all realms of artistic production, especially in popular music, but also the visual arts, theater, film... more
  • Dibur Issue

    The Long Poem

    Edited by Uri S. Cohen, Michael Golston, Vered K. Shemtov
  • Dibur Article

    After the Long Poem

    by Rachel Blau DuPlessis
    Could I ever write an adequate summation of my work with the long poem? My writing of Drafts is a palimpsest of encounters and stacked timelines, necessities, drives, and stubbornness. Such an... more

Featured Colloquies

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Recent Multimedia

  • no image
    video
    by Patrick Trefz
    Margaret Cohen, Anne Higonnet, and Jim Denevan discuss representations of the ocean in painting, sculpture, photography, and film.
  • no image
    video
    by Melissa Langer and Catharine Axley
    The ocean is not just one thing. How have we imagined the oceans? How have we represented them? Margaret Cohen and Anne Higonnet reflect on these questions.
  • no image
    video
    by Caetano Veloso
    The singer and songwriter is interviewed by Marjorie Perloff at the 2016 Modern Language Association Convention in Austin. He discusses his early encounters with American music, how he views his...

Publications

Recent Blogs

By seeing how heroic masculinity passes on a legacy of hatred and violence that continues old injustices, what comes to the fore is the vital need to acknowledge our own personal connections to histories of violence.
Maligned in popular conceptions of the history of medicine, Afro-American religious healers in early modern Cartagena played a constructive role in the development of an science that privileged empiricism over dogma in Pablo Gómez's new study, The Experiential Caribbean.
A Finnish film about the inhumanity and pervasive danger of a system that functions to deny asylum and force deportation, even if that film is warm-hearted, should also be deeply unsettling to US viewers in 2018.
When playing chess, what do you mean when you say "check"? Per Wittgenstein, perhaps we communicate in ways that have surprisingly little to do with what we actually say.
Rather than ignoring the toxic legacies of our industrial past, what if we engaged with remnants such as Newtown Creek to imagine a more fluid and dynamic Antropocene that moves away from green fantasies towards assessing troubling but necessary realities?