Blogs

by David Shih | 11.30.2017
Donald Trump did not invent the ungrateful black athlete stereotype, but he made it familiar. The stereotype recasts professionals at the top of their game as that black person who doesn’t know how to do their job. Maxine Waters. Frederica Wilson. La David Johnson. Barack Obama. “Ungrateful” is only the latest way to say that a black worker is unworthy because they are black.
Religious reformers like Martin Luther laid the groundwork for the later emergence of Liberal political economy by purging late-medieval conceptions of the monetary instrument as a potentially boundless public utility from the collective imagination.
by Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra | 11.20.2017
Toussaint Louverture is celebrated by some as a saint worthy of his namesake. Recent work by historian Philippe Girard paints a less saintly portrait of this seminal figure of the Haitan Revolution. 
by Ali Shakir | 11.13.2017
The lifting of the driving ban marks a new era for women in Saudi Arabia, but why do US Liberals seem muted in their advocacy for similar progressive social policies around the Muslim world?  
by William Flesch | 10.31.2017
On the power of probablity to haunt the ontology of everyday things. 
by Gregory Jusdanis | 10.02.2017
Beauty, whether in the animal or human world, exists in the eye of the beholder. Evolution is as much about allure, sensory delight, and subjective experiences as it as about survival of the fittest.
by William Flesch | 09.25.2017
It is one thing to take inspiration from another's work for one's own creative writing, but it is entirely another to complete a work first conceived and named in another's fiction. What to make of such fictions within fictions?  
by Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra | 09.18.2017
According to myth, The Alamo honors the resilience and courage of Anglos and Tejanos pitted against Mexican centralism, brutality, and corruption. In fact, The Alamo is all about emancipation and slavery.
by Christopher Warley | 09.13.2017
Auerbach's command of languages have often made him seem inimitable. But they did not always come easily to him, and they were not exactly a result of training. They were a result of his temperament: his urge to learn what he needed to learn in order to write what he wanted to write.
by Scott Ferguson | 07.26.2017
MMT and Marxism share histories and methods but diverge at the level of ontology. Critical humanists must reckon with this cleavage in order to help forge a more just and prosperous future.  

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