video

Art/History: How South of Market Became SOMA

Michael B. Kahan and Janet Delaney discuss the history of San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood from 1970 to the present.

Speaker: 
Michael B. Kahan and Janet Delaney
Description

Michael B. Kahan and Janet Delaney discuss the history of San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood from 1970 to the present. Through word and image, their dialogue uncovers how the forces of capital shaped the neighborhood's work, housing, culture, and built environment, ultimately transforming South of Market from a space of art production to a space of art consumption and patronage.

Janet Delaney is fine art photographer whose work focuses on the experience of city life. She is the author of South of Market (2013), Public Matters (2018) and Red Eye to New York (2021), all published by MACK Books of London. She was a member of the Stanford Creative Cites Working Group from 2018 to 2020 and continues to photograph in San Francisco.

Michael Kahan is the co-director of the Program on Urban Studies at Stanford University, and a senior lecturer in Sociology. His interest in the historical transformation of urban space has led to publications on topics including the integration of streetcars in the 1850s, sanitation reform in the 1890s, the geography of prostitution in the 1910s, and redevelopment in California in the 1990s. From 2016 to 2020, he served as the convener of the Creative Cities Working Group at Stanford. He holds a B.A. from Yale and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, both in history. 
 

Join the Colloquy